83844301

October 31, 2002 § Leave a comment

quoting michael moore

And thank you, Bushmaster Firearms, Inc., for providing the gun
used to shoot the 13 people in the DC area. Bushmaster’s president,
Richard E. Dyke, was the Maine finance chairman of George W.
Bush’s 2000 Presidential campaign. According to Business Week,
Dyke had to step down as Bush’s finance chair “after reporters began
quizzing him about his business dealings. Bushmaster Firearms Inc.,
is notorious for using loopholes to sidestep a 1994 federal ban on
assault rifles.” Bush and Bushmaster. Too tragically perfect.

Yours,

Michael Moore

mike@michaelmoore.com

http://www.michaelmoore.com

dc: powerful. he karmic lines..

83844301

October 31, 2002 § Leave a comment

quoting michael moore

And thank you, Bushmaster Firearms, Inc., for providing the gun
used to shoot the 13 people in the DC area. Bushmaster’s president,
Richard E. Dyke, was the Maine finance chairman of George W.
Bush’s 2000 Presidential campaign. According to Business Week,
Dyke had to step down as Bush’s finance chair “after reporters began
quizzing him about his business dealings. Bushmaster Firearms Inc.,
is notorious for using loopholes to sidestep a 1994 federal ban on
assault rifles.” Bush and Bushmaster. Too tragically perfect.

Yours,

Michael Moore

mike@michaelmoore.com

http://www.michaelmoore.com

dc: powerful. he karmic lines..

83844301

October 31, 2002 § Leave a comment

quoting michael moore

And thank you, Bushmaster Firearms, Inc., for providing the gun
used to shoot the 13 people in the DC area. Bushmaster’s president,
Richard E. Dyke, was the Maine finance chairman of George W.
Bush’s 2000 Presidential campaign. According to Business Week,
Dyke had to step down as Bush’s finance chair “after reporters began
quizzing him about his business dealings. Bushmaster Firearms Inc.,
is notorious for using loopholes to sidestep a 1994 federal ban on
assault rifles.” Bush and Bushmaster. Too tragically perfect.

Yours,

Michael Moore

mike@michaelmoore.com

http://www.michaelmoore.com

dc: powerful. he karmic lines..

83724140

October 29, 2002 § Leave a comment

Would Reform Ruin Japan? Would Reform Ruin Japan?
By AKIO MIKUNI and R. TAGGART MURPHY

Quoting

TOKYO
It is an old routine that goes back half a century: a sudden show of resolve in Tokyo to do whatever it takes to fix whatever problem worries the United States complete with “reformist” ministers and bold policy pronouncements. In time, both the policy and the minister are forgotten, and Japan returns to business and politics as usual.

dc: what is left out is that Japan has a positive ballance of paymens, and is still a major exporter, and still the world’s second largest economy, in dollar value. The Jpanese have a real problem, but they could never spend enough to safe the rest of the world, because the world is not producing stuf the Japanese want to buiy.

83724140

October 29, 2002 § Leave a comment

Would Reform Ruin Japan? Would Reform Ruin Japan?
By AKIO MIKUNI and R. TAGGART MURPHY

Quoting

TOKYO
It is an old routine that goes back half a century: a sudden show of resolve in Tokyo to do whatever it takes to fix whatever problem worries the United States complete with “reformist” ministers and bold policy pronouncements. In time, both the policy and the minister are forgotten, and Japan returns to business and politics as usual.

dc: what is left out is that Japan has a positive ballance of paymens, and is still a major exporter, and still the world’s second largest economy, in dollar value. The Jpanese have a real problem, but they could never spend enough to safe the rest of the world, because the world is not producing stuf the Japanese want to buiy.

83724140

October 29, 2002 § Leave a comment

Would Reform Ruin Japan? Would Reform Ruin Japan?
By AKIO MIKUNI and R. TAGGART MURPHY

Quoting

TOKYO
It is an old routine that goes back half a century: a sudden show of resolve in Tokyo to do whatever it takes to fix whatever problem worries the United States complete with “reformist” ministers and bold policy pronouncements. In time, both the policy and the minister are forgotten, and Japan returns to business and politics as usual.

dc: what is left out is that Japan has a positive ballance of paymens, and is still a major exporter, and still the world’s second largest economy, in dollar value. The Jpanese have a real problem, but they could never spend enough to safe the rest of the world, because the world is not producing stuf the Japanese want to buiy.

83347218

October 22, 2002 § Leave a comment

Study: Republicans dominate tech votes

quoting

By Declan McCullagh
October 21, 2002, 9:42 AM PT

Republican politicians trounced their Democratic rivals in a roundup
released on Monday of congressional votes that were favorable to the
technology industry.

The scorecard, compiled by the Information Technology Industry Council
(ITIC) and published in time for next month’s elections, graded each
member of Congress on their votes over the last two years on computer
security, Internet taxes and free trade. […]

The trade association released only a list of how individual
politicians voted, but an analysis performed by CNET News.com shows
that House Republicans voted in accordance with the tech industry’s
views 89 percent of the time, compared with just 43 percent of the
time for Democrats.

dc: Part of the reason he democrats can’t emerge as basically more future economy oriented (towards sustainability) is because they too are mired in old industry relationships.

There is no party yet for quality of life and sustaniability with the clear recognition that from a national competititiveness point of view this would be best. In short we have no future oriented party, but two “conservative” parties.

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