89927079

February 28, 2003 § Leave a comment

TIME Magazine: Do You Want This War?

quoting:

But what if the end of alliance is the deeper truth? Then the new game will be the old game of nations. No more privileged relationships, just ever-changing combinations as in the 18th and 19th centuries. History whispers that this was bound to happen once the balance of power tilted as drastically as it did when the Soviet Union collapsed, leaving the last remaining superpower to rule the roost. But for America’s unprecedented might to endure, it will have to be softened by trust and acceptance. Will Bush & Co. muster so much wisdom? Tomorrow’s historians will know the answer. In the meantime, Saddam Hussein has scored three long-distance victories just by sitting tight. As the intra-Western war continues, his prediction may yet come true. “No doubt, time is working for us,” Saddam told the Egyptian weekly al-Usbou in November. “We have to buy some more time, and the American-British coalition will disintegrate.”

dc: the deper analysis continues to develop. There is a lot of maturing going on. But will we end up like spectators to the murder of kitty genovese?

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89927079

February 28, 2003 § Leave a comment

TIME Magazine: Do You Want This War?

quoting:

But what if the end of alliance is the deeper truth? Then the new game will be the old game of nations. No more privileged relationships, just ever-changing combinations as in the 18th and 19th centuries. History whispers that this was bound to happen once the balance of power tilted as drastically as it did when the Soviet Union collapsed, leaving the last remaining superpower to rule the roost. But for America’s unprecedented might to endure, it will have to be softened by trust and acceptance. Will Bush & Co. muster so much wisdom? Tomorrow’s historians will know the answer. In the meantime, Saddam Hussein has scored three long-distance victories just by sitting tight. As the intra-Western war continues, his prediction may yet come true. “No doubt, time is working for us,” Saddam told the Egyptian weekly al-Usbou in November. “We have to buy some more time, and the American-British coalition will disintegrate.”

dc: the deper analysis continues to develop. There is a lot of maturing going on. But will we end up like spectators to the murder of kitty genovese?

89927079

February 28, 2003 § Leave a comment

TIME Magazine: Do You Want This War?

quoting:

But what if the end of alliance is the deeper truth? Then the new game will be the old game of nations. No more privileged relationships, just ever-changing combinations as in the 18th and 19th centuries. History whispers that this was bound to happen once the balance of power tilted as drastically as it did when the Soviet Union collapsed, leaving the last remaining superpower to rule the roost. But for America’s unprecedented might to endure, it will have to be softened by trust and acceptance. Will Bush & Co. muster so much wisdom? Tomorrow’s historians will know the answer. In the meantime, Saddam Hussein has scored three long-distance victories just by sitting tight. As the intra-Western war continues, his prediction may yet come true. “No doubt, time is working for us,” Saddam told the Egyptian weekly al-Usbou in November. “We have to buy some more time, and the American-British coalition will disintegrate.”

dc: the deper analysis continues to develop. There is a lot of maturing going on. But will we end up like spectators to the murder of kitty genovese?

89855715

February 27, 2003 § Leave a comment

If Felons Could Have Voted, National Election Outcomes Would Have Been Different

quoting

WASHINGTON, DC—If current and former felons had been allowed to vote, the outcome of as many as seven U.S. Senate races and one presidential election since 1978 might have been altered. Felon disenfranchisement laws, combined with high rates of criminal punishment in the United States, sometimes play a decisive role in elections. This is the finding of a study by sociologists Christopher Uggen, University Minnesota, and Jeff Manza, Northwestern University, reported in the most recent issue of the American Sociological Review.

dc: the constitution is not quite tight enough to make it impossible to take away the right to vote.

89855715

February 27, 2003 § Leave a comment

If Felons Could Have Voted, National Election Outcomes Would Have Been Different

quoting

WASHINGTON, DC—If current and former felons had been allowed to vote, the outcome of as many as seven U.S. Senate races and one presidential election since 1978 might have been altered. Felon disenfranchisement laws, combined with high rates of criminal punishment in the United States, sometimes play a decisive role in elections. This is the finding of a study by sociologists Christopher Uggen, University Minnesota, and Jeff Manza, Northwestern University, reported in the most recent issue of the American Sociological Review.

dc: the constitution is not quite tight enough to make it impossible to take away the right to vote.

89855715

February 27, 2003 § 1 Comment

If Felons Could Have Voted, National Election Outcomes Would Have Been Different

quoting

WASHINGTON, DC—If current and former felons had been allowed to vote, the outcome of as many as seven U.S. Senate races and one presidential election since 1978 might have been altered. Felon disenfranchisement laws, combined with high rates of criminal punishment in the United States, sometimes play a decisive role in elections. This is the finding of a study by sociologists Christopher Uggen, University Minnesota, and Jeff Manza, Northwestern University, reported in the most recent issue of the American Sociological Review.

dc: the constitution is not quite tight enough to make it impossible to take away the right to vote.

89754453

February 25, 2003 § Leave a comment

from stratfor

quoting

Washington’s decision to redefine the conflict was driven by the
ineffectiveness of this response. The goal has been to compel
nations to crack down on citizens are enabling al Qaeda —
financially, through supplying infrastructure, intelligence and
so on. Many governments, like that of Saudi Arabia, had no
inclination to do so because the internal political consequences
were too dangerous and the threat from the United States too
distant and abstract. The U.S. strategy, therefore, was to
position itself in such a way that Washington could readjust
these calculations — increasing cooperation and decreasing al
Qaeda’s ability to operate.

Invading Iraq was a piece of this strategy. Iraq, the most
strategic country in the region, would provide a base of
operations from which to pressure countries like Syria, Iran and
Saudi Arabia. Iraq was a piece of the solution, but far from the
solution as a whole. Nevertheless, the conquest and occupation of
Iraq would be at once a critical stepping-stone, a campaign in a
much longer war and a proof of concept for dealing with al Qaeda.

If the United States does not invade Iraq, it will have to
generate a new war-fighting strategy against al Qaeda. The
problem for Washington is that it doesn’t have another strategy,
except the homeland defense/global covert war strategy, which has
not proved clearly effective by itself since Sept. 11. If the
United States abandons the operation in Iraq, follow-on
operations against enabler of al Qaeda will be enormously more
difficult.

dc: smart.

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