Notes feb 1 2009

February 2, 2009 § 1 Comment

Report nyt davos blog

 
 

Last night, I traded impressions with a number of long-time Davos attendees, who all opined the mood was by far the grimmest since they started going. The head of large hedge fund that was pretty successful last year (oops, am I giving him away, too?) said my story about credit market distress was five or six weeks old, and now many firms can get money if they look for it. When I asked him to explain more, he mentioned that his firm has just helped a company with a very strong credit rating roll over its one-year paper. I am not sure the company was as happy about the deal as he was; it had to pay a 22 percent interest rate.

 
 

And

 
 

Interesting small computer.

 
 

And

 
 

 Obama is already setting a new historic course by reorienting the economy from private consumption to public investments directed at the great challenges of energy, climate, food production, water and biodiversity.

 
 

Pasted from <https://www.google.com

 
 

 
 

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Jeff Sachs seems to be pleased with the new administrations commitment to “a new age of sustainable development”:

Rewriting the rulebook for 21st-century capitalism, by Jeffrey Sachs, CIF, The Guardian: One of President Barack Obama’s historic contributions will be a grand act of policy jujitsu – turning the crushing economic crisis into the launch of a new age of sustainable development. … Obama is already setting a new historic course by reorienting the economy from private consumption to public investments directed at the great challenges of energy, climate, food production, water and biodiversity.

 
 

The new president has taken every opportunity to underscore that the economic crisis will not slow, but rather will accelerate, the much-needed economic transformation to sustainability. … The fiscal stimulus … will lay down the first steps of a massive generation-long technological overhaul…

Obama has started with the most important first step: a team of scientific and technological advisers of stunning quality… He has also focused on two core truths of sustainable development: that technological overhaul lies at the core of the challenge, and that such an overhaul requires a public-private partnership for success. Taking shape, therefore, is nothing less than a new 21st-century model of capitalism … committed to the dual objectives of economic development and sustainability…

Consider the challenge of a bankrupt automobile sector… In the Obama strategy, GM will not be closed to punish it… It’s worth far too much as a world leader in the electric vehicles of the 21st century. .

 
 

 
 

and

 
 

Entitlement Myths

By MICHAEL KINSLEY Thursday, Jan. 29, 2009

 
 

In an interview with CNBC from the World Economic Forum on Friday, Mr. Rubenstein acknowledged the many challenges facing private equity firms, the largest one being the difficulty of getting loans for leveraged buyouts.

 
 

And

 
 

How much does labor supply respond to changes in wealth and credit? If this research is correct, the recent declines in wealth and credit may cause increased entry into the labor market, resulting in an even higher unemployment than is currently being forecast:

 
 

And , about justice and love

 
 

Rather than seeking to define justice, Plato teaches that the very desire for a coherent and knowable theory of justice is the original impulse underlying injustice.

 
 

And

 
 

My paper takes seriously such suspicions. I argue that the Republic is best read as a cautionary tale that tells of the danger of theorizing about justice. Rather than seeking to define justice, Plato teaches that the very desire for a coherent and knowable theory of justice is the original impulse underlying injustice.

And

 
 

1 Parrhesia was considered a central element of Athenian democracy, an ideal of debate in the Assembly, underwriting accountability in speech as a limit to the possibility of deceptive oratory that threatened the public good and preoccupied Athenian thought. 2 It provided a norm against which one’s words could be scrutinized, becoming “the frontline of defense against flattery, bullying, corruption, deception, or incompetence on the part of the speakers.” 3 Parrhesia posited a particular view of the ideal speaker: “parrhesia is a kind of verbal activity where the speaker has a specific relation to truth through frankness, a certain relationship to his own life through danger, a certain type of relation to himself or other people through criticism…and a specific relation to moral law through freedom and duty.”

 
 

My central contention is that while liberal theory is absolutely right to raise the individual to the ultimate principle of justice, liberalism cannot resolve the contradictions of modern life because of the way in which it conceives of the individual. Based in the Enlightenment, liberalism interprets the person through an oppositional scale with autonomy at one end and dependence at the other” (2).

 
 

 
 

This points to a large research agenda: the need to understand which interdependencies foster autonomy and which interfere with it, and the need to understand how specific institutions play educational roles and the ways in which they play manipulative roles. 

 
 

the problem with Enlightenment liberalism may not be its valorization of the capacity to make choices, as Willett writes, but rather its impoverished, non-social notion of the self to which it attributes this capacity to make choices. From this perspective, today we suffer less from the over-valorization of the choice than we do from its under-valorization, 

 
 

the problem with Enlightenment liberalism may not be its valorization of the capacity to make choices, as Willett writes, but rather its impoverished, non-social notion of the self to which it attributes this capacity to make choices. From this perspective, today we suffer less from the over-valorization of the choice than we do from its under-valorization, 

 
 

 In this context, Willett seeks to understand the social pathos of injustice through the category of hubris. This is the most distinctive, most original, most engaging feature of the book. Willet understands that she cannot simply import this notion from classical Athens where it was understood as a serious crime of the privileged elite against the poor masses.

 
 

…. “the discussion of eros and hubris through a three-dimensional vision of human identity and social freedom”: “First, these conceptions of identity and freedom reach down deep into the power of the erotic at the core of personality;” “Second, they pose the person as a social event;” and, “Third, we learn from these writers how the child might mature through erotic rites of reconnection rather than stoic rituals of separation” (185-186), how a child might come to inhabit a “home for the extended family of humankind” (202), as Willet writes in illuminating chapters on Douglass and Morrison.

 
 

 
 

What, then, is the connection between the social bonds of eros and justice? In “the African-American context,” these social bonds, race and class divisions, are themselves contested. This work, Willett summarizes, carries forward “the discussion of eros and hubris through a three-dimensional vision of human identity and social freedom”: “First, these conceptions of identity and freedom reach down deep into the power of the erotic at the core of personality;” “Second, they pose the person as a social event;” and, “Third, we learn from these writers how the child might mature through erotic rites of reconnection rather than stoic rituals of separation” (185-186), how a child might come to inhabit a “home for the extended family of humankind” (202), as Willet writes in illuminating chapters on Douglass and Morrison.

 
 

In our loves and our friendships we seek in the other something that corresponds with our self. We must not expect that the soul of the one is the same as the soul of another. The pathos of shame and the catharsis of love differ for men and women, for mothers and for their children. We grow in spirit as we seek and find those whose stories we can lay next to our own. These relationships do not require fusion. (225)   

 
 

Archived Online Book Reviews

The Soul of Justice. By CYNTHIA WILLETT. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2001.

John J. Stuhr

 
 

And from wiki

 
 

Aristotle defined hubris as follows: to cause shame to the victim, not in order that anything may happen to you, nor because anything has happened to you, but merely for your own gratification. Hubris is not the requital of past injuries; this is revenge. As for the pleasure in hubris, its cause is this: men think that by ill-treating others they make their own superiority the greater.

 
 

The following from link

 
 


 
 


 


 
 

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Sexual Justice argues that the achievement of equality for lesbian and gay citizens is part of the unfinished business of modern democracy. In Romer v. Evans the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Colorado’s Amendment 2 is unconstitutional because it denies homosexuals “equal protection of the laws” and makes them second-class citizens. But lesbian and gay men already suffer pervasive legal disabilities: half the states define relations between members of the same sex as a crime; only eight states protect queer citizens from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations; no state grants same-sex couples the rights available to heterosexuals who marry.

 
 

Sexual Justice develops the full implications of equal citizenship, defending a robust conception of lesbian and gay rights that includes civil rights laws that prohibit retaliation for the exercise of political rights and recognition for queer relationships and families. Kaplan insists that sexual desire plays a central role in the pursuit of happiness: individuals must be free to shape their lives and define their personal identities through a variety of “voluntary associations.” He connects the marginalization of lesbians and gay men with efforts to maintain the subordination of women. The argument draws on law, philosophy, psychoanalysis, history, and literature, focusing especially on Plato, Thoreau, Freud, Rawls, Arendt, and Foucault.

 
 

Sexual Justice should be of interest to a general audience concerned with human rights and social justice as well as to scholars interested in lesbian, gay and queer studies, philosophy, political and legal theory, intellectual history, cultural studies and feminism

More details

Sexual Justice: Democratic Citizenship and the Politics of Desire

By Morris B. Kaplan

Published by Routledge, 1997

ISBN 041590515X, 9780415905152

281 pages

 
 

Pasted from <http://books.google.com/books?id=sA9TOBDkqxgC>

 
 

 
 

 
 

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The Cambridge Companion to Plato’s Republic

8 Eros in the Republic

Paul W. Ludwig

The Republic repeatedly treats eros as if it were unruly or bad and ought to be remade to be more congenial to good government. The illegality of choosing a mate for oneself, compulsory coed exercising in the nude, the imposition of eugenically determined match making, and the enforced discipline of having many sexual partners but no single partner to call “one’s own” are decidedly strange institutions. Such attempts to coerce and mold eros to fit abstract justice imply a negative judgment about the political effects of ordinary erotic desire that is not in harmony with the liberated views about love and sex prevalent in most liberal democracies today. Nor are the coercive and legalistic stances toward sexual unions taken in the Republic and other political dialogues (e.g.,Pol. 310bff.) in harmony with certain other dialogues of Plato, namely, the “erotic” dialogues, which literally sing the praises of eros: in the Symposium and Phaedrus, eros is said to lead upward to pure beauty and goodness. In fact, the coercive parts of the Republic are not even in harmony with other parts of the Republic itself, for – just after the erotic regimen has been legally imposed – there follows a disquisition on eros that reads like a Symposium in miniature, with a profligate, promiscuous eros providing humanity’s primary mode of access to the Forms.

 
 

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§ One Response to Notes feb 1 2009

  • Mollie says:

    Did Gm deserve the bailout? You Ask me I would say NO.. why? When Honda and Toyota were out inventing new cars, GM was busy boasting about its pride and Showing off its hungry hungry Daughter the Hummer

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