5. More AIG

March 21, 2009 § Leave a comment

and, interesting argument.

In other words, it is in the taxpayers’ best interest to position A.I.G. as a company with many profitable units, worth potentially billions, and one bad unit that needs to be unwound. Which, by the way, is the truth. But as Mr. Ely puts it, “the indiscriminate pounding that A.I.G. is taking is destroying the value of the company.” Potential buyers are wary. Customers are going elsewhere. Employees are looking to leave. Treating all of A.I.G. like Public Enemy No. 1 is a pretty dumb way for a majority shareholder to act when he hopes to sell the company for top dollar.

But the high salaries and bad behavior are still an issue.  Then

But there is a much bigger issue that has barely been touched upon by Congress: the way tens of billions of dollars of taxpayers’ money has been funneled to A.I.G.’s counterparties — at 100 cents on the dollar. How can it possibly make sense that Goldman SachsBank of America,Citigroup and every other company that bought credit-default swapsfrom A.I.G. should be made whole by the government? Why isn’t it forcing them to take a haircut?

via Talking Business – From Washington, an A.I.G. Flogging for the Masses – NYTimes.com.

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You are currently reading 5. More AIG at Reflections on GardenWorld Politics Douglass Carmichael.

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