351. Thought and human prospects.

March 8, 2010 § Leave a comment

The krugman article ends,

For someone else, this loss might be a devastation, but even though for thirty years thinking deeply about economics was all Krugman really cared about, he has let it pass out of his life without regret. “I think he’s happy,” his friend Craig Murphy says. “A much happier person now than when we first met him. He feels like he’s done good things, and they’re greater than what he expected when he was young. If there is sadness in him at all, I think it is a tiny core of profound sadness of the kind that the Buddha understood—that we probably can’t use human rationality to make the world all better, and it would be really nice if we were able to.” ♦

via How Paul Krugman found politics : The New Yorker.

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You are currently reading 351. Thought and human prospects. at Reflections on GardenWorld Politics Douglass Carmichael.

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