373. Robots, nano, and third world economies

April 5, 2010 § Leave a comment

*And so we have a Japanese restaurant with robot waiters.  Net unemployment?  The human value of contact with a real person? Probably quite high.

 

*Reading last night  on why science and democracy go together. This theme is important because science at its best contains an ethic of honesty and openness that is wonderful for its practitioners. But science has also mainstreamed itself into an instrument of power and money. This book is not very helpful because it keeps making statements that don’t hold up to any analysis. In fact these mistakes  so egregious I am almost inclined to believe the author must know this. The question then is one of motive. The science of liberty by Tim Ferris (once editor of  wired). Liberty is defined insucha an open way that those who merely wnt the capcity to crate monopoly corporations are included. In fact the problem of corporations as closed systems attempting market control is not touched on. He is rather a publicist and slings language the way a child (paiget) says the red block goes with the green ball goes with the green spoon,,

 

*Perhaps all farce is implcitly metaphysical.

-Harold Bloom in "shakespeare"

 

*Nanotech is seen by many, and I am inclined, as one of the great hopes for redesigning the economy, both as to purpose and as to means. But there are warnings

 

Amid Nanotech’s Dazzling Promise, Health Risks Grow

 

See the timeline for nanotech

 

And a conference  posted videos.

 

January 16-17, 2010

Palo Alto, California

http://foresight.org/conf2010/

We are happy to announce that all videos from Foresight 2010, our January conference, are now posted:http://www.vimeo.com/album/176287

 

Pasted from <http://www.foresight.org/>

 

*The tendency to feature Feynman as the founder of nanotech  raises the intriguing question. Einstein and Feynman are two of the world’s mot charismatic people, and give a a kd of humanist seal of approval to science in ways they might not like

 

And

 

The financial backbone of the economy is a corner of capitalism that requires more intrusive and careful regulations than a lot of economists thought. Because of the centrality of credit in a capitalist economy, a capitalist economy is inherently unstable. This instability can become catastrophic unless you have something in place to mitigate it. Unfortunately no one seems to have very many great ideas on how to do this.

 

Pasted from <http://www.harpers.org/archive/2010/03/hbc-90006718>

 

 

This instability can become catastrophic unless you have something in place to mitigate it. Unfortunately no one seems to have very many great ideas on how to do this.

 

Pasted from <http://www.harpers.org/archive/2010/03/hbc-90006718>

 

If you’re a company who owes your creditors their capital every night,

 

Pasted from <http://www.harpers.org/archive/2010/03/hbc-90006718>

 

There’s a major exception to this, which is Raghuram Rajan. He is listened to a lot and has a lot of good ideas. He’s one of the skeptics of excessive deregulation. So he’s riding high now.

 

Pasted from <http://www.harpers.org/archive/2010/03/hbc-90006718>

 

The point of quoting this is because it represents a major division toward the future: will it be one world of managerial necessity, or regional and local, with wars and fears? I think history is on the side of regional, avoiding the large bureaucratization of the world, but one humanity on one planet is compel
ling logic. there are major attempts ahead to deal with the problems, intertwined, of economics, finance, and consumption.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading 373. Robots, nano, and third world economies at Reflections on GardenWorld Politics Douglass Carmichael.

meta

%d bloggers like this: