Future indicators

May 31, 2010 § Leave a comment

Is a college education worth the money? : The New Yorker:

The safest of all degrees to be acquiring this year is in accounting: forty-six per cent of graduates in that discipline have already been offered jobs. Business majors are similarly placed: forty-four per cent will have barely a moment to breathe before undergoing the transformation from student to suit. Engineers of all stripes—chemical, computer, electrical, mechanical, industrial, environmental—have also fared relatively well since the onset of the recession: they dominate a ranking, issued by Payscale.com, of the disciplines that produce the best-earning graduates. Particular congratulations are due to aerospace engineers, who top the list, with a starting salary of just under sixty thousand dollars—a figure that, if it is not exactly stratospheric, is twenty-five thousand dollars higher than the average starting salary of a graduate in that other science of the heavens, theology.

Part of the momentum of money and finance based industry, and it’s hints about the anticipated (like now) future.

Douglass Carmichael Doug@dougcarmichael.com

Stanford MAHB, Stanford Strategy Studio, Media X
Shakespeare and Tao Consulting

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Financial squeeze upward

May 31, 2010 § Leave a comment

All movements in the economy get managed and gamed. The desire now is to keep income stable or up in the top 10%and take cash from the fest. So the deficit will be repaid by in part taking back stimulus and cutting unemployment  this ia a sign of bad faith that will make climate response more difficult.

WASHINGTON — The delicate task ahead for the Federal Reserve and other central banks is deciding when to start boosting interest rates and reeling in all the stimulus pumped out during the global financial crisis, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said Sunday.



Douglass Carmichael Doug@dougcarmichael.com

Stanford MAHB, Stanford Strategy Studio, Media X
Shakespeare and Tao Consulting

Stanford energy seminar

May 31, 2010 § Leave a comment

Oil shale

May 31, 2010 § Leave a comment

The urge for oil ( a bit manipulated) is driven by the urge for profit (source of status and security in our society). We need to be mindful of the momentum for shake already under way . This from tech talk at the oil drum 

One of the large numbers that is often quoted in response to the concerns that some of us express over future energy supplies relates to the amount of oil that is present in oil shale. However, there seems to be a general consensus among many that write about world energy, that the 2 trillion barrels of oil potentially available out of the 4 trillion barrels locked in the United States oil shales are not, at the present time, a realistic source of supply. So for the next couple or more weeks these weekly tech talks will be discussing oil shale. The Federal Government is reviewing the leasing process for these lands, and so it might be timely.

To read previous posts in this series of tech talks, click here.

Douglass Carmichael Doug@dougcarmichael.com

Stanford MAHB, Stanford Strategy Studio, Media X
Shakespeare and Tao Consulting

Pi mine

May 31, 2010 § Leave a comment

This looks terrible, but what if the people below were owners and shared the benefits and spent each only two hours down below? Our whole relate ship to nature, economy and exploitation would be happier. The class split and tapped scaling we got instead, through quasi or real slave labor, was a bad choice.

Picture from the oil drum tech talk

Douglass Carmichael Doug@dougcarmichael.com
Stanford MAHB, Stanford Strategy Studio, Media X
Shakespeare and Tao Consulting
Http://dougcarmichael.com/blog Http://gardenworldpolitics.com

O tech implications for sustainability

May 30, 2010 § Leave a comment

The Oil Gusher and tech

Change is rarely technology driven, it has on a few occasions been technology reactive. Resource shortages and greed are bigger drivers of change and technology has been a big enabler for the past hundred years.

Smart perspective.

Douglass Carmichael Doug@dougcarmichael.com

Stanford MAHB, Stanford Strategy Studio, Media X
Shakespeare and Tao Consulting

gull oil seriousness

May 30, 2010 § Leave a comment

Quite interesting

What disturbs me is that I don’t think we are seeing a maximum effort to clean up this mess, or anywhere close. A maximum effort might be to comandeer fifty oil tankers and put them to work sucking up the contaminated sea water, and meanwhile put all the resources available from any and all construction companies to work building a treatment plant to separate the oil from the water the tankers suck up. A war, even on foreign shores would receive such an effort. Why not this, which is much more important to the country than any foreign war? So long as BP is in charge, all decision will be made with an eye toward saving money and there will not be the maximum effort that this situation merits.

this from a site, the oil drum, almost real time analysis.

Douglass Carmichael Doug@dougcarmichael.com

Stanford MAHB, Stanford Strategy Studio, Media X
Shakespeare and Tao Consulting

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