156. making numbers too important.

July 11, 2009 § Leave a comment

Here is an example of  our stress on the numerical and aithmetic rather than on content in business planning and enterprise management.

Swivel | Make your business smarter. .

150. Sputnik Observatory For the Study of Contemporary Culture

July 7, 2009 § Leave a comment

This is a very intersting site, forthe tech, which is conversations and comments in little videos, well connected an fairly easy to navigate.

Sputnik Observatory For the Study of Contemporary Culture.

128. clay shirky and graphical wall

June 24, 2009 § Leave a comment

image

ted conference

127. Brain represents tools as temporary body parts, study confirms

June 23, 2009 § Leave a comment

When thinking of cultural change, this is a clue as to what is going on. The body is reconfigured through the tools it uses. It is a question of identity and function working together.

Brain represents tools as temporary body parts, study confirms

Researchers have what they say is the first direct proof of a very old idea: that when we use a tool—even for just a few minutes—it changes the way our brain represents the size of our body. In other words, the tool becomes a part of what is known in psychology as our body schema, according to a report published in the June 23rd issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication.

“Since the origin of the concept of body schema, the idea of its functional plasticity has always been taken for granted, even if no direct evidence has been provided until now,” said Alessandro Farnè of INSERM and the Université Claude Bernard Lyon. “Our series of experiments provides the first, definitive demonstration that this century-old intuition is true.”

In the new study, Farnè, Lucilla Cardinali, and their colleagues reasoned that if one incorporates a used tool into the body schema, his or her subsequent bodily movements should differ when compared to those performed before the tool was used.

Indeed, that is exactly what they saw. After using a mechanical grabber that extended their reach, people behaved as though their arm really was longer, they found. Whats more, study participants perceived touches delivered on the elbow and middle fingertip of their arm as if they were farther apart after their use of the grabbing tool.

People still went on using their arm successfully following after tool use, but they managed tasks differently. That is, they grasped or pointed to object correctly, but they did not move their hand as quickly and overall took longer to complete the tasks.

Its a phenomenon each of us unconsciously experiences every day, the researchers said. The reason you were able to brush your teeth this morning without necessarily looking at your mouth or arm is because your toothbrush was integrated into your brains representation of your arm.

The findings help to explain how it is that humans use tools so well.

“We believe this ability of our body representation to functionally adapt to incorporate tools is the fundamental basis of skillful tool use,” Cardinali said. “Once the tool is incorporated in the body schema, it can be maneuvered and controlled as if it were a body part itself.”

via Brain represents tools as temporary body parts, study confirms.

123. In Venice, Peter Greenaway Takes Veronese’s Figures Out to Play – NYTimes.com

June 23, 2009 § Leave a comment

In Venice, Peter Greenaway Takes Veronese’s Figures Out to Play, our strategy room at its best!

Courtesy of Peter Greenaway

via Art – In Venice, Peter Greenaway Takes Veronese’s Figures Out to Play – NYTimes.com.

92. Jeffrey Schnapps blog | Stanford Humanities Lab

May 5, 2009 § Leave a comment

The value of iamges in backgrounds. here, the announement of futurism and wild energy, so the music score..

Jeffrey Schnapps blog | Stanford Humanities Lab.

76. Dinner With David Bradley, an A-List Affair – washingtonpost.com

April 27, 2009 § Leave a comment

The need for conversation..

For more than a year, David Bradley, the Atlantic’s soft-spoken owner, has hosted these off-the-record dinners at a specially built table in his glass-enclosed office overlooking the Potomac. And the guests, from Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner to Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke to Jordan’s King Abdullah II, are as A-list as they come.

“It’s just a joy for me,” Bradley says. “These are reflective, considered conversations, which is hard to do when you’re going after headlines for the next day’s publication.” While the guests seem quite open, says the businessman who bought the Atlantic a decade ago, he is new enough to journalism “that I can’t tell the difference between genuine candor and deeply rehearsed candor.”

via Howard Kurtz – Media Notes by Howard Kurtz: Dinner With David Bradley, an A-List Affair – washingtonpost.com.

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